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NFPA 70E Electrical Safety Training

NFPA 70E Electrical Safety Training

Grainger has the services and resources to help keep your workplace in compliance with the NFPA 70E Electrical Safety standard. The easy-to-follow training courses, informational webinars and technical articles are just what you need to help ensure you are in compliance and your employees have a safe work environment. Don’t look any further to find what you need for NFPA 70E Electrical training. Check it out below!

Specialized Online Training Courses

Access our library of online safety training courses (subscription required):

NFPA 70E® 2018 Series:

Module 1: An Introduction to NFPA 70E (2018)

This self-paced online course is the first in a series of five modules that cover safety-related work practices and procedures in NFPA 70E.

This self-paced online training course is the first in a series of five modules that introduce many safety-related work practices and procedures in NFPA 70E. Module 1 discusses the purpose and scope of the standard, which is designed to help minimize the risk of employee injuries from electrical hazards and establish a safer workplace for employees who work on electrical equipment. It provides an overview of the elements of an electrical training program as well as the general types of personal protective equipment (PPE) used in an overall electrical safety program.

Upon completion you should be able to:

  • Explain the purpose of NFPA 70E
  • Describe the electrical hazards in the workplace, including electric shock, arc flash and arc blast
  • Explain the general requirements for maintaining electrical safety in the workplace, including PPE, approach boundaries, the arc flash boundary and working while exposed to electrical hazards
  • Explain communications required between host and contract employers and training requirements for qualified and unqualified persons
  • Describe the elements of an electrical safety program, including program principles, controls and procedures; risk assessment; auditing; and job briefing
  • Describe the proper use of test instruments and equipment, portable electric equipment and GFCIs

Who Will Benefit

Anyone whose job involves designing, reviewing, evaluating or installing electrical systems, including: designers, installers, engineers, electrical contractors, technicians, project managers, safety managers and inspectors.

Course Summary

  • The regulations and requirements of NFPA 70E are intended to establish and support safe workplaces.
  • There are three main electrical hazards: electric shock, arc flash and arc blast, two of which are directly addressed by NFPA 70E.
  • Employers have an obligation to train all employees in safety-related work practices and safety awareness to the extent those employees face a risk of electrical hazards in their work.
  • Employers must implement an overall Electrical Safety Program.
  • A job briefing must be conducted with employees before starting each job. The briefing must cover such things as job hazards, work procedures, PPE requirements and any special safety-related issues.
  • Test equipment and other equipment and their associated cords and plugs and other accessories must be handled appropriately and visually inspected for defects and damage before each use.

Module 2: Establishing an Electrically Safe Work Condition (2018)

Module 2 covers the elements of an electrically safe work condition, the principles of lockout/tagout, energy control procedures and the use of temporary protective grounding equipment.

This self-paced online training course covers the elements of an electrically safe work condition, the principles of lockout/tagout, energy control procedures and temporary protective grounding.

Upon completion you should be able to:

  • Identify the necessary elements of an electrically safe work condition
  • Explain principles of lockout/tagout execution
  • Explain energy control procedures
  • Identify equipment requirements for lockout/tagout and protective grounding
  • Identify how creating an electrically safe work condition can itself be a hazardous task

Who Will Benefit

Anyone whose job involves designing, reviewing, evaluating or installing electrical systems, including: designers, installers, engineers, electrical contractors, technicians, project managers, safety managers and inspectors.

Course Summary

  • There is a 6-step process for verifying an electrically safe work condition.
  • Lockout/tagout procedures are critical for protecting workers from electrical hazards. Employees must be trained and familiar with these procedures.
  • Employers are responsible for developing, documenting and implementing lockout/tagout procedures.
  • Hazardous electrical energy sources can be controlled in two ways. These are:
    • Simple lockout/tagout
    • Complex lockout/tagout

Module 3: Energized Electrical Work Permits (2018)

Module 3 explores the sections of the standard that provide workers with safety guidelines for times when de-energizing is not possible or when it could create increased or additional hazards.

This self-paced online training course covers the sections of the NFPA 70E standard that provide workers with safety guidelines for times when de-energizing is not possible or when it could create increased or additional hazards. Generally, energized electrical work permits are required for work on equipment that cannot be put into an electrically safe work condition. This course will focus on exploring the different elements of these permits and why each is important.

Upon completion you should be able to:

  • Identify when an Energized Electrical Work Permit is required
  • Explain what information a Shock Risk Assessment provides
  • Explain what information an Arc Flash Risk Assessment provides
  • List tasks for which an Energized Electrical Work Permit may not be required, and the necessary conditions
  • Identify which hazard is addressed by approach boundaries
  • Identify the approach boundaries that unqualified employees are never allowed to cross, even with an escort

Who Will Benefit

Anyone whose job involves designing, reviewing, evaluating or installing electrical systems, including: designers, installers, engineers, electrical contractors, technicians, project managers, safety managers and inspectors.

Course Summary

  • In many cases, energized electrical work (work involving electrical hazards) requires the completion and approval of an energized electrical work permit.
  • After identifying the circuits and equipment to be worked on, a written justification for the work must be provided, and the safe work practices that will be employed must be identified.
  • A shock risk assessment will determine:
    • Who will be exposed to what voltage
    • Locations of the two approach boundaries
    • Necessary PPE to help minimize or eliminate the threat of electric shock (typically voltage-rated insulation of some type)
  • An arc flash risk assessment will determine:
    • The risk of an arcing fault
    • The Arc Flash Boundary (where arc flash protection PPE is required)
    • Necessary PPE to help minimize or eliminate the threat of arc flash burns (the rating of PPE required)
  • Other important elements of an energized electric work permit include:
    • The necessary PPE, tools and work methods to safely perform the assigned task
    • Means employed to restrict the access of unqualified persons from the work area
    • Evidence of completion of a job briefing
    • Energized work approval signature(s)
  • Some exceptions permit appropriately protected qualified persons to work on energized equipment without a permit.

Module 4: Personal Protective Equipment and Clothing (2018)

Module 4 covers the general requirements for personal protective equipment (PPE) and flame-resistant (FR) clothing and how to select PPE for the specific hazards involved with various tasks.

This self-paced online training course covers the general requirements for personal protective equipment (PPE) and arc-resistant clothing and how to select PPE for the specific hazards involved with various tasks. This course also includes "Playing It Safe," a series of self-study questions.

Upon completion you should be able to:

  • Explain the intent and limitations of the PPE required by NFPA 70E
  • Select the appropriate PPE for the specific hazards involved with various tasks
  • Identify the sources of PPE requirements for protection against shock and arc flash
  • Explain the alternatives for determining the required PPE for working on energized circuits/equipment
  • Understand and apply the Arc Flash PPE Category numbering system
  • Explain the requirements for labeling of electrical equipment for selection of shock and arc flash PPE

Who Will Benefit

Anyone whose job involves designing, reviewing, evaluating or installing electrical systems, including: designers, installers, engineers, electrical contractors, technicians, project managers, safety managers and inspectors.

Course Summary

  • There are items of PPE and arc-rated clothing for every area on your body that could be exposed to electrical hazards. Manufacturers design many of these to meet the requirements of specific standards. Selection of arc-rated PPE can be done based on detailed incident energy analysis or NFPA 70E provides tables that make PPE selection relatively easy for some common tasks.
    • The first table considers the task and the condition of the electrical equipment to determine if arc flash PPE is required.
    • The second table produces PPE Categories based on the type of equipment and assumed short-circuit current values and clearing times or arcing durations. If these assumptions are met, a PPE category is produced for the task and equipment.
    • Using the PPE Category number, the third table is used to select the required protective equipment and arc-rated clothing for the task.
  • When you select protective clothing and equipment, make sure that it:
    • Is clean and free of defects
    • Complies with all applicable standards
    • Fits and covers you as it should
    • Allows you to perform your work without interference
  • Arc flash hazards may give rise to a need for unique protective equipment, such as flash suits and special face, hand and foot protection.
  • PPE for shock protection is selected based on the voltage of the equipment to be worked on.

Module 5: Use and Care of Protective Equipment and Other 70E Requirements (2018)

This module examines the additional requirements for personal protective equipment (PPE). Employees must be provided with and use PPE where electrical hazards are present.

This self-paced online training course covers the additional requirements for PPE beyond selection of PPE ratings. Employees must be provided with and use PPE where electrical hazards are present. The PPE must be selected for both the parts of the body that are exposed to an electrical hazard, dependent upon the particular hazards that are present, and the work to be performed.

Upon completion you should be able to:

  • Comply with requirements for the proper use of PPE when working on energized electrical circuits/equipment
  • Understand the protection requirements for all parts of the body while inside an Arc Flash Boundary
  • Identify the various types of PPE required for arc flash hazards
  • Explain the differences between “flame-resistant” and “arc-rated” clothing
  • Properly inspect and care for PPE to ensure its continued ability to protect from shock/arc flash hazards
  • Explain the difference between “non-conductive” and “insulated” tools
  • Establish boundaries for shock and arc flash hazards per the standard
  • List the techniques of alerting others to dangers of shock/arc flash when working on energized electrical circuits/equipment
  • Explain the general scope and content of Chapters 2 and 3 in NFPA 70E

Who Will Benefit

Anyone whose job involves designing, reviewing, evaluating or installing electrical systems, including: designers, installers, engineers, electrical contractors, technicians, project managers, safety managers and inspectors.

Course Summary

  • Most of this module is devoted to discussing the types, function, characteristics, testing, care and maintenance of personal protective equipment (PPE). Most of these requirements are located in Chapter 1, primarily in section 130.7. Some of the critical issues covered are:
    • PPE must be provided and designed to protect every part of the body.
    • PPE must be constructed of appropriate materials.
    • PPE must be inspected and maintained to ensure its ability to perform its intended function. Article 250 covers some of these requirements.
    • PPE and other protective equipment must comply with applicable standards.
    • Means must be provided to alert others when hazards are present. Both qualified and unqualified persons have to be warned if they are exposed to a hazard.
  • The contents and types of rules included in Chapters 2 and 3 of NFPA 70E are discussed:
    • Chapter 2 provides maintenance requirements for electrical installations and equipment and PPE.
    • Chapter 3 provides work practices and some installation requirements for special equipment.
 
 
 
 

Featured Webinars

 
 
 
 

Related Articles

 

These online publications can help train your staff on how to work safely ?around electrical hazards.

Quick Tips Article #263 - NFPA 70E: Electrical Safety Summary
Quick Tips Article #266 - Electrical Safety

 

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