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Axes, Machetes, Hooks & Wedges

87 products
Axes, machetes, hooks, and wedges use their sharp edges to cut wood, brush, and other growth. Axes drive their wedged blade into wood to fell trees, remove branches, and split logs. Machetes use their long, broad blade to clear undergrowth, slice through stalks and stems, and remove twigs and small branches. Brush hooks and ditch bank blades have hooked blades that grab and slice through dense brush, vines, and undergrowth. Wedges split wood along its grain to create firewood or split large logs into smaller pieces.
Axes, machetes, hooks, and wedges use their sharp edges to cut wood, brush, and other growth. Axes drive their wedged blade into wood to fell trees, remove branches, and split logs. Machetes use their long, broad blade to clear undergrowth, slice through stalks and stems, and remove twigs and small branches. Brush hooks and ditch bank blades have hooked blades that grab and slice through dense brush, vines, and undergrowth. Wedges split wood along its grain to create firewood or split large logs into smaller pieces.

Pulaski Axes

Pulaski Axes
Pulaski axes feature an axe blade for cutting and an adze for scraping and digging. These fire axes are commonly used by wildland firefighters and forest fire teams to chop down or shave bark from trees, dig out roots, and clear brush and undergrowth.
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Machetes

Machetes
The long, broad blade of machetes clears undergrowth to maintain paths, slices through stalks and stems to harvest crops, and removes twigs and small branches. Their short handle allows one-handed control to wield the blade, leaving the other hand free to stabilize or gather materials being cut.
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General Purpose Axes

General Purpose Axes
Axes drive their wedged blade into wood to fell trees, remove branches, and split logs. They have a single-bit head attached at a right angle to a long handle. Axes require two hands to swing and maximize their striking force.
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Hatchets

Hatchets
Hatchets pair an axe head with a short handle for one-handed use. They are used for smaller wood chopping and splitting tasks.
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Splitting Mauls

Splitting Mauls
The extra-long handle of these splitting mauls increases their swing arc to drive their thick, heavy head downward with greater force than a general purpose axe. Also called sledge-eye mauls, they have a cutting bit on one end and a striking face on the other end. The bit cuts like an axe head and the face drives splitting wedges into wood to split along the grain.
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Splitting Wedges

Splitting Wedges
Splitting wedges cleave wood along its grain to create firewood or split large logs into smaller pieces to ease transport. These triangular tools taper from a thick, flat end to a thin, sharp edge. Striking the flat end with a maul or hammer drives the sharp edge into the wood to split it.
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Hammer Hatchets

Hammer Hatchets
The dual-purpose head on hammer hatchets has a flat face for striking and an axe bit for chopping. Also called roofing axes, they are commonly used in demolition, construction, and by roofers to hammer in nails and cut shingles.
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Pick Head Axes

Pick Head Axes
Pick-head axes feature an axe blade for cutting and a pick for prying. These fire axes are commonly used by firefighters and rescue teams to chop into and pull away roofing and floorboard materials to create ventilation holes. The axe blade cuts through doors, walls, roofs, and floors. The pick breaks glass, twists off padlocks, and pries open doors and windows.
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Ditch Bank Blades

Ditch Bank Blades
Double cutting edges on ditch bank blades cut on both the forward and back swings to swiftly chop through heavy brush and saplings. Their curved blade hooks and slices through bushes, vines, and dense undergrowth. They have a heavy blade and a long handle to add momentum to their swing. Ditch bank blades are commonly used to clear trails, strip bark from logs, and cut down saplings.
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Axe Handles

Axe Handles
These handles fit compatible axe heads to replace broken handles or change to handles of a different length or material.
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Crash Axes

Crash Axes
The dual-purpose head of crash axes features a pike on one end and an axe blade on the other. The pike punctures holes, chips tiles and masonry, and twists off hasps and hardware. The axe blade chops through sheet metal, drywall, plaster, and other materials to gain entry to vehicles, rooms, and cabinets. Crash axes are commonly used by firefighters and rescue teams to break glass, pry open doors and windows, and cut sheet metal.
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Machete Axes

Machete Axes
Machete axes combine the broad blade of a machete to clear undergrowth and the head of an axe to chop through small branches. The curve at the base of the axes hooks onto and slices through dense grasses, brush, and vines. Their short handle allows one-handed control to wield the axe, leaving the other hand free to stabilize or gather materials being cut.
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Brush Hooks

Brush Hooks
The curved blade of brush hooks grabs and slices through dense brush, vines, and undergrowth. Also called bush hooks or brush axes, they have a heavy blade and a long handle to add momentum to their swing. They are commonly used to clear trails, strip bark from logs, and cut down saplings.
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Double-Edged Axes

Double-Edged Axes
Two cutting bits on these double-edged axes allow them to last longer between sharpening. Also called double-bit axes, they commonly have one edge sharpened for chopping wood and the other edge left more blunt for splitting wood or cutting roots. They position their long handle in the center of the cutting head to balance the weight of the head. Axes require two hands to swing and maximize their striking force.
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Non-Sparking Axes

Non-Sparking Axes
Non-sparking axes contain no ferrous metals, so they resist creating sparks. This reduces the risk of ignition when making cuts in locations where combustible dust or flammable liquids, gas, or vapors are present. Axes drive their wedge-shaped blade into wood to fell trees, remove branches, and split logs. They have a single- or double-bit head attached to a long handle.
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Non-Sparking Hatchets

Non-Sparking Hatchets
Non-sparking hatchets contain no ferrous metals, so they resist creating sparks. This reduces the risk of ignition when making cuts in locations where combustible dust or flammable liquids, gas, or vapors are present. Hatchets pair an axe head with a short handle for one-handed use. They are used for smaller wood chopping and splitting tasks.
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Non-Sparking Adzes

Non-Sparking Adzes
Non-sparking adzes contain no ferrous metals, so they resist creating sparks. This reduces the risk of ignition when making cuts in locations where combustible dust or flammable liquids, gas, or vapors are present. Adzes shave off layers of wood to plane, shape, and smooth beams, boards, and other large, wood surfaces. They also work as hoes to break up soil and remove weeds. Their blade edge sits horizontal to the handle, and angles into surfaces to scrape off layers with each swing of the adze.
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